Lesson about development from Mexico

A more realistic development model is Mexico, a country that has turned its significant advantages into several modern areas but failed miserably in eradicating poverty across the country. Many people are disappointed with the mistake of some specific policies. However, this also shows the difficulties that emerging countries face.

Mexico has a lot of advantages. The economy is more closely related to the United States than to China: the country’s one-week export turnover to the world’s largest consumer market is greater than the export turnover to China in a year.

Once dependent on oil, Mexico now has a larger and more sophisticated industrial base than any Latin American country, exporting cars behind Germany, Japan and South Korea. In the past two decades, the Mexican macroeconomic management has been perfect.

Recently, the country has opened the oil and gas industry for private investment and sought to solve a private monopoly. Mexico also has an increasingly wealthy middle class and an industrial corridor that runs from the border with the US to Mexico City. The political system is also basically stable.

The third lesson from Mexico is the need to bring the informal economy to light. Small and unregistered companies are groups that provide work for most of the workforce, but are estranged by banks and looking for ways to evade taxes. This drains the raw plastics of the economy.

In the past decade and a half, while the productivity of the largest companies in Mexico increased by 5.8 percent a year, the productivity of the smallest companies fell by 6.5 percent a year. This is very common in small grocery stores in Mexico, where tacos are made and sold at all bus stops, as well as in restaurants in India, where only 2 percent of sales are Retail food and groceries are in the formal sector.

Electronic invoices, which create electronic traces for the tax department, and mobile banking services, which bring the poor out of the cash economy, are promising measures.

Life in Mexico City: who gets angry, that person fails

In the impression of journalist Megan Frye, Mexico City is where people never get angry. During this time in this Central American city, she met only one person who lost her temper in public. But this guy is not local people.

When witnessing a man screaming in a cafe with the cashier: “She stole my money” because she thought the bounce was short of money, Megan was very surprised. Everyone in the shop looked at the impatient guy with an attitude of hesitation, and the cashier avoided going inside to reduce the guests’ rage. After this person left, she resumed her work and smiled, serving other guests as if nothing had happened, according to the BBC news.

From a young age, Mexican children were taught that “Who is angry, that person loses.” Eleazar Silvestre, an immigrant from the northern desert of Sonora, said: “We were taught to be calm in all situations.” This is especially reflected in the central region of the country, including the Mexican capital, one of the most modern and integrated cities in Latin America.

When you ask for directions in Mexico City, you may find yourself walking around following someone’s instructions. Simply because this person does not want to confess to you that they do not know the way and will be rude. Likewise, when you take a taxi, if you are kind to the elegant, polite greetings, you will have a comfortable ride and be enthusiastically helped by the driver.

Some natives also argue that not looking at the eyes of the opposite person while talking is a sign of respect, looking at each other’s eyes is often seen as a declaration of war.

TheĀ  elegant language was passed down by the natives themselves, then blended with the polite tradition of the Spanish in the 16th century. This is most evident in central and southern Mexico. , which is dominated by nearly 300 years by Spaniards and 100 years by dictatorships.