Life in Mexico City: who gets angry, that person fails

In the impression of journalist Megan Frye, Mexico City is where people never get angry. During this time in this Central American city, she met only one person who lost her temper in public. But this guy is not local people.

When witnessing a man screaming in a cafe with the cashier: “She stole my money” because she thought the bounce was short of money, Megan was very surprised. Everyone in the shop looked at the impatient guy with an attitude of hesitation, and the cashier avoided going inside to reduce the guests’ rage. After this person left, she resumed her work and smiled, serving other guests as if nothing had happened, according to the BBC news.

From a young age, Mexican children were taught that “Who is angry, that person loses.” Eleazar Silvestre, an immigrant from the northern desert of Sonora, said: “We were taught to be calm in all situations.” This is especially reflected in the central region of the country, including the Mexican capital, one of the most modern and integrated cities in Latin America.

When you ask for directions in Mexico City, you may find yourself walking around following someone’s instructions. Simply because this person does not want to confess to you that they do not know the way and will be rude. Likewise, when you take a taxi, if you are kind to the elegant, polite greetings, you will have a comfortable ride and be enthusiastically helped by the driver.

Some natives also argue that not looking at the eyes of the opposite person while talking is a sign of respect, looking at each other’s eyes is often seen as a declaration of war.

TheĀ  elegant language was passed down by the natives themselves, then blended with the polite tradition of the Spanish in the 16th century. This is most evident in central and southern Mexico. , which is dominated by nearly 300 years by Spaniards and 100 years by dictatorships.