Museum of Mexican National Anthropology where architecture honors the history of the Mayan cultural tradition

National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City – is Mexico’s largest museum. For many consecutive years, the museum has always been on the list of the world’s top museum rankings. In 2016, the museum was ranked 5th on Trip Advisor’s list because of its popularity with archaeological and anthropological artifacts dating back to the pre-Columbian era of Mexico.

The museum’s collection Includes: Stone sun and a room dedicated to the Mayan culture. This is one of the richest archaeological museums in Latin America when it owns all of the ancient art and cultural ruins throughout Mexico.

Visitors may take days or even weeks to wander the 36,000m2 of the museum. Besides, with a modern architectural solution that harmonizes well with traditional elements, it is assessed that this is the place where architecture honors the history of the Mayan cultural tradition of Mexico.

In 2009, the Mexican Government planned to invest 163 million pesos (about 13 million USD) to upgrade the infrastructure at the museum and archaeological sites. At the same time, the Mexican National Commission for Culture and Arts also said that the committee will use 12 million pesos (about $ 1 million) to modernize the National Museum of History and Anthropology.

The whole building building is designed as a large memorial, including galleries surrounding a courtyard and a large 79,700m2 pond equivalent to nearly 8ha. There are a total of 23 galleries and a number of outdoor galleries with galleries around the yard.

The traditionally American design allows the rooms to be surrounded by large gardens and many of them are garden statues with outdoor exhibits. This courtyard is inspired by the architecture of the Nunnery building in Uxmal. Swimming pool in the courtyard outside the area with lotus flowers.

Besides being a unique shaped metal statue structure covered a sundial trumpets through the hours. Planning the design of gardens creates valuable buffer spaces, creating a natural landscape close to the surrounding nature.

The foyer space has a square structure made of white marble from Santo Tom├ís, Puebla – a reminder of the use of common stone in monumental buildings of pre-Spanish cultures of Mexico. Large window designs are the main solution for natural light to illuminate each gallery space.