The difference between US and Mexican High School

Both the United States and Mexico use the K-12 education system, but the system is not the same in both countries. For students who want to study in the US and their parents want to send them, it is important to recognize some of these differences.

This blog lists five relevant differences between American and Mexican high schools. That may be helpful for those curious about an educational opportunity in the United States.

In the United States, individual states adopt textbooks that schools will use and then books are purchased by LEAs. The state also decides the general curriculum to be taught to students in each school. This can make a small difference in the quality and content of what students in different states learn.

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Even in the same state, students can use different textbooks from students from another town. This model is largely different for Mexican high schools.

Textbooks are decided at the national level for uniform distribution across the school, and the curriculum is also standardized by the federal government. Students learn from the same book and on a unified lesson plan.

Materials such as textbooks are provided free of charge in the public education system. In Mexico, recently only high school has become compulsory for students. Previously, students were required to complete only high school. They can choose from a variety of options on how they want to continue Prepa.

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In the US, most high schools offer a similar type of education. Although technical high schools exist, most students will complete a standard education that includes a core curriculum. This education system usually prepares students for a university education and acts as a preview for the liberal arts system.

In Mexico, students have more options for the type of education they want to pursue. An equal part of high school students choose to enroll in professional and vocational high schools. Early on students can specialize in a certain technical field that will train them directly for their future careers.

Private education in Mexico is strong and sustainable

The new century has witnessed a nearly doubling in the number of private university students in Mexico, now about one million students. This is a dramatic increase, although private students make up only about 30 percent of the total student population – a modest figure.

For basic social, economic and political reasons, the demand for public higher education has not decreased and the government continues to generously finance the region.

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Government-non-action is not new. The problem here is that it continues to make it easy, or in the parlance of the critics, “acceptance” of the private sector. This situation allows private educational institutions to be established, legally licensed and operated.

There are very few restrictions, so establishing a private university is as easy as opening a bakery shop. Many new regulations from the mid-1990s may cause some anxiety for investors in private education, but not enough to create a decisive turning point. Good quality private schools easily meet government regulations, the rest find their way around regulations.

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Taking advantage of the favorable conditions, the private education sector has recently developed new forms: private university networks, chain of private schools and online training. Online postgraduate education is growing rapidly and 80 percent of the growth in this sector is privately owned, but the scope of this article covers networks and chains only.

The new PHE models above reflect the bold initiatives of the private sector. In this section we will examine government reform initiatives in three key areas of public education: operational evaluation, quota allocation, and institutional diversification. In each area, the government’s goal is to make public higher education economically more affordable.

Similarly, the Mexican government decided to stop funding the training of popular traditional industries that saturated students and thus undermined public interest. The Government promulgates enrollment quotas for medical, civil engineering, law, business and management disciplines.

However, the results are not as expected: with the financial support of the family, students still enroll in their favorite fields – mainly because these fields provide higher incomes. Many candidates who fail to enter public schools due to enrollment limitations still pursue their aspirations at private universities.